Some parents decide that public schooling isn’t a good fit for their kids, and they don’t want to pursue a private school. These parents might decide that homeschooling is the best option for their kids. But what happens if the parents divorce? There are several factors that might impact whether you’re allowed to homeschool the kids if you go through a divorce.

One of the primary factors is which parent has the decision-making powers for education. If the court grants you this responsibility, you should be able to homeschool your children. If you and your ex share that power, you’ll have to work with them to determine what option is the best for the child. If your ex has the decision-making power, you’ll have to do what they decide.

Another important factor is what’s in the child’s best interests. This is what the court will consider if it has to make the decision about homeschooling. There are several things that are considered in these cases, including whether the child is being taught the required information based on Michigan’s laws. Socialization is another consideration.

Because some homeschool options are based on religious beliefs and incorporated into the teachings, you should discuss with your ex if this might be a factor in the decision. Other decisions, such as what types of ethical points will be handled with the children, should also be discussed.

Typically, parents who can come to an agreement on what’s best for the kids are more likely to provide a continuous learning environment regardless of who the children are with at the time. It might behoove you to try to work things out with your ex so that the kids are given what they need to thrive.

The inclusion of homeschooling decision in the parenting plan can help you avoid disagreements in the future. Be sure to include every agreement you come to with your ex, so there aren’t questions later.