Recent studies show education level is, in fact, a key factor that repeatedly appears in lists of commonalities among couples whose marriages end in court. Michigan readers might not immediately think of how far they went in school when asked to list the top three markers that suggest propensity toward divorce.  As it stands, those who leave high school before earning diplomas are far more prone to  marriages that do not last.

As many as half of marriages that include at least one spouse who dropped out of high school end in divorce. People who achieve college degrees are 20 percent less likely to call it quits in marriage. A psychologist weighing in on the topic said he believes it has more to do with the fact that lower education levels tend to lead to lower incomes, and lower incomes often lead to stressful lives. 

Also according to recent marriage data, the prime ages to marry are between 20 and 32; before or after those ages, spouses are more prone to divorce. Marital stability also appears to be greatly affected by whether the husband, in particular, works full time. If not, then chances for divorce are high. Another perhaps surprising factor that is a red flag for possible divorce is couples who can’t seem to keep their hands off one another as newlyweds. While most would assume that’s a good thing, studies show people whose marital beginnings are less touchy-feely have the greatest chance of avoiding divorce.

Studies can provide information that points toward certain results; however, no marriage is fully divorce proof, and no one can predict with 100 percent accuracy whether a particular marriage will last. That’s why it’s important for all Michigan spouses to know where to turn for support if needed. A family law attorney is typically a great asset in such circumstances.

Source: businessinsider.com, “7 things science says predict divorce“, Shana Lebowitz, Accessed on Oct. 28, 2017