Many Michigan residents are currently battling it out with soon-to-be former spouses in family court. For some, a major topic of contention is who will live with the children involved in a particular situation; for others, money is a high priority issue specifically, whether either spouse is entitled to alimony. There are no set-in-stone laws regarding this type of post divorce financial support.

Every state has its own laws and judicial precedent, although there are typical guidelines that most judges consider before handing down decisions. It’s never safe to assume a particular outcome in divorce proceedings because things can quickly and unexpectedly change in one person’s favor or the other. In fact, that’s one of the many reasons most people hire family law attorneys to represent them, so that their rights and best interests will be well protected as courtroom events unfold.

Where alimony is concerned, there are certain reasons judges may be less likely to award it. For instance, if a marriage lasted only a very short time, say one or two years, a judge may not find it necessary to make one spouse contribute to the financial support of the other. If the person requesting alimony has remained employed throughout the marriage, the court may decide he or she has no need for additional financial support.

Even if a spouse has been unemployed during marriage, if there are no children at home or any existing reason to prevent that person from earning an income, the court is more than likely going to say that the request for alimony is denied and that the spouse requesting it should obtain gainful employment for his or her own financial support. Such situations are often complicated, especially if there are children involved. A Michigan family law attorney can offer guidance to anyone facing current divorce-related problems in this state.

Source: divorce.lovetoknow.com, “Length of Marriage to Get Alimony“, Audrey M. Jones, Accessed on Aug. 23, 2017